rh8548pj
Author archives

  • DB Tuesday: Gale Business Insights Global

    Have you ever used Business Insights: Global? It is a unique source for international business intelligence offering a comprehensive and convenient way to find case studies, in-depth statistical data coupled with deep research, and the ability to compare global economies, countries and industries. Major topics include company & industry profiles, case studies, histories, business news, and financial reports. Coverage runs from 1967-present.

    Here is just a sampling of the topics you can research:

    • Compare global economies, industries, and companies 
    • Deep-dive financials on specific companies 
    • Companies in your region within a certain range of revenue 
    • Company history 
    • Plunkett reports 
    • SWOT analyses on specific companies 

    Search tips:

    • Company Finder can be used to generate lists of companies narrowed by country, state, city, SIC (Standard Industrial Classification) code, NAICS (North American Industry Classification System) code, revenue, and number of employees
    • Under Industries, Plunkett reports includes Analytics, Deep Financial Benchmarks, Metrics and Revenue Forecasts

     

    What does it look like in action? 

    Landing page:  

     

    Company history page:  


     

    SWOT analysis:  

     

    Market share analysis:

     

    Glossary of business terms:

     

     

    Let us know how this database works for you! Email library@dctc.edu or call 651-423-8366 with feedback and questions.  

    December 8, 2020 • DB Tuesday • Views: 764

  • DB Tuesday: Gale OneFile: Computer Science

    Have you ever used Gale OneFile: Computer Science? It contains resources on all things computer – hardware, software, communications, and more! The database provides information on computer-related product introductions, news and reviews in areas like hardware, software, electronics, engineering, and the application of technology. Content types range from academic journal articles to newspapers, books to videos. Coverage runs from 1984-present.

    Here is just a sampling of the topics you can research:

    • Networks 
    • Security 
    • Tech company profiles 
    • Accessibility 
    • Specific devices 
    • Software development 

    Search tips:

    • Subject guide search is a bit of a misnomer – it’s a subject search, in that you search for a keyword and it provides subjects that fit your keyword. They don’t have actual subject guides that you are searching. 
    • Example advanced search: to learn about network security at IBM, do an advanced search for ‘network security’ and ‘IBM’.

     

    What does it look like in action? 

    Landing page:  

     

    A basic journal article search:  


     

    A subject guide search for laptop computers:  

     

     

    Let us know how this database works for you! Email library@dctc.edu or call 651-423-8366 with feedback and questions.  

    November 17, 2020 • DB Tuesday • Views: 629

  • Tuesday is national Take a Hike Day!

    Happy Take a Hike Day! And no, it doesn’t mean “get out of here” – it literally means to put on some shoes and go for a hike outside. While there isn’t much information about the history of Take a Hike Day, it was apparently started by the American Hiking Association to encourage people to try hiking. The health benefits of hiking are manyfold, including increasing muscle and bone strength, improving balance, decreasing stress and anxiety, and building relationships with companions. It’s an easy activity to begin, without a need for much equipment beyond shoes and a water bottle. And the best part for right now? It’s covid-friendly! Outdoor activities where you can socially distance are supported and encouraged at this time, and hiking definitely fits the bill.

    If you’d like to hike but aren’t sure where, Dakota County has numerous parks and trails that are all open now. Other counties have trails as well; just search for your county name and ‘hiking’. The state also maintains numerous paved and unpaved trails.

    If you have questions about hiking, feel free to email library@dctc.edu! We’ll do our best to help.

    November 16, 2020 • Uncategorized • Views: 559

  • LearningExpress Library

    Have you ever used LearningExpress Library? This excellent learning & test prep resource covers a variety of topics useful to DCTC students:

    • high school equivalency
    • college prep
    • college success
    • adult core skills
    • computer skills
    • career preparation
    • job & career acceleration

    You can prepare for the journeyman electrician exam, the ATI-TEAS for nursing, the ACT or SAT, the GED, and CLEP tests, among others. You can access free e-books, articles, and tutorials on interview prep and resume writing, improving your writing and grammar, or prepping to become a U.S. citizen. There are even Spanish-language resources. I encourage you to explore all that the LearningExpress Library has to offer!

     

    Any questions? Email library@dctc.edu!

    November 12, 2020 • Collection Updates • Views: 600

  • New videos in Films on Demand!

    Films On Demand added 643 new videos in October. There are studies of decades from the 1940’s to the 2000’s, a feature on the Vietnam War, counseling tips from Lee Greenberg, a documentary on mental illness among Olympic athletes, and so much more! Take a look!

     

     

     

     

    November 10, 2020 • Collection Updates • Views: 613

  • DB Tuesday: Gale OneFile: Communications and Mass Media

    Have you ever used Gale OneFile: Communications and Mass Media? It contains journal articles on all aspects of the communications field, including advertising, public relations, linguistics, and literature. Coverage runs from 1969 to the present.

    Here is just a sampling of the topics you can research:

    • Journalistic objectivity 
    • Mediation 
    • Online advertising 
    • Linguistically diverse populations 
    • Language processing 
    • Print media 

     

    Search tips:

    • Subject guide search is a bit of a misnomer – it’s a subject search, in that you search for a keyword and it provides subjects that fit your keyword. They don’t have actual subject guides that you are searching. 
    • Example advanced search: To find research on the impact of Facebook advertising, you could search for ‘facebook’ AND ‘advertising’, narrowing the results to academic journals. 

     

    What does it look like in action? 

    Landing page:  

    A basic journal article search:  

     

     

    A subject guide search for journalism:  

     

     

    Let us know how this database works for you! Email library@dctc.edu or call 651-423-8366 with feedback and questions.  

    November 10, 2020 • DB Tuesday • Views: 627

  • Veterans Day

    Veterans Day is this Wednesday, November 11th. What is Veterans Day, and why do we celebrate it?

    Veterans Day was originally called Armistice Day. It was instituted by President Woodrow Wilson in 1919 to commemorate the ending of World War I. At the time, World War I was referred to as “the war to end all wars”. It was hoped and believed that another global war would not be fought. While the war officially ended in June 1919, an armistice agreement (armistice means to stop open acts of warfare – like a cease-fire) went into effect at 11:00 a.m. on November 11th, 1918 (the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month). Thus November 11th, 1918 is generally referred to as the end of the war. President Wilson said the day was to be “filled with solemn pride in the heroism of those who died in the country’s service and with gratitude for the victory”. Because of the belief that World War I was the last world war that would be fought, peace was something significant to be constantly celebrated and remembered. In 1938, Armistice Day was made a legal national holiday with parades and public speeches, as well as a temporary pause of business at 11:00 a.m.

    How did Armistice Day become Veterans Day? In 1954, after World War II and the Korean War, veterans organizations urged Congress to change the name of Armistice Day to Veterans Day to honor all American veterans, not only those from World War I. Now Veterans Day is a holiday to celebrate all American veterans, past, present, and future. If you’d like to learn more about the history of Veterans Day, I encourage you to visit the Veterans Affairs page devoted to this holiday.

    What are some common ways of celebrating Veterans Day? Many towns still hold parades and ceremonies. Veterans are often invited to attend and/or speak at such ceremonies. Schools may hold assemblies with students’ family members who are veterans in attendance. The U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs offers an excellent teacher’s guide for planning a Veterans Day celebration. The Minnesota Department of Veterans Affairs usually holds a Veterans Day program, but this year they are producing a video that will be posted on their website on Veterans Day.

    You can send a message to our DCTC veterans by filling out this form. You can also see a few DCTC students and staff who are veterans on the DCTC blog.

    If you are a veteran or in active service, or the family of a service member, we encourage you to visit our Military and Veterans Service Center for all the great campus resources available to you.

    Have a safe and happy Veterans Day!

     

    November 9, 2020 • Topical • Views: 578

  • New titles

    Take a look at the new books and movies we added to our collection during October! You can find these and everything else in our collection through our catalog, OneSearch. Here are just a few of the new titles. Check them out!

        

       

        

    November 4, 2020 • Collection Updates • Views: 1535

  • DB Tuesday: Gale In Context: College

    Have you ever used Gale In Context: College? It provides an excellent multi-resource view of a wide variety of topics from literature to countries to historical time periods, and is a great first stop for your research paper! Coverage runs from 1964 to the present.

    Here is just a sampling of the topics you can research:

    • The 1970’s 
    • Nigeria 
    • Barack Obama 
    • Big business 
    • Soccer 
    • Halloween 
    • Idaho 
    • Body image 

    Search tips:

    • Use ‘Browse Topics’ to read about popular topics 
    • Basic search for simple keywords 
    • Advanced search to search within a publication, for keyword combinations, authors, and more
      • Example advanced search: If you wanted to know more about the use of nuclear power in Australia, you could search the keywords “Australia” AND “nuclear power”  

    What does it look like in action? 

    Landing page:  

     

    Browse topics:  

     

     

    Topical main page:  

     

     

    Let us know how this database works for you! Email library@dctc.edu or call 651-423-8366 with feedback and questions.  

    November 3, 2020 • DB Tuesday • Views: 556

  • Is it true?

    It is challenging to evaluate information in the media, with so many sources of news and so many opinions. How can you decide if what you are reading is true? Here are a few questions to try to answer that can help guide your thinking.

    1. Where did the information come from? Can you find the name of the individual or organization who published the information? Who paid for it? If the information is anonymous, that calls into question its reliability, because it means the author isn’t willing to stand by their words.

    2. Is this source reliable and qualified? Once you know who wrote or said the information, you can evaluate that source for reliability. Do they have some special training or knowledge that qualifies them to speak on the subject? If it is a journalist, are they an eyewitness or did they speak to eyewitnesses? Do they cite their sources? If the author is giving an opinion or evaluation, do they have education and experience in that field? Has the person’s writing proven reliable in the past?

    3. Can I confirm the information from another trusted source? Much of the information we’re reading hasn’t been seen or heard just once. Can you find another writer, journalist, or the like who has the same information, preferably from their own eyewitness account or speaking to different eyewitnesses? Do they have a track record of reliability?

    4. Can I detect bias? It can be challenging to identify bias; we all have a natural inclination to trust what we already believe ourselves. Try to suspend your own beliefs and see if you can determine the beliefs of the writer. Can you tell if they have an opinion on the subject? Do they use emotional words? Are they describing an event or trying to persuade you to believe their perception of the event? If it’s political, can you tell which party the writer is in?

    I hope these questions help guide you in being a discerning reader or viewer. If you need help finding credible sources for school work, please reach out to us at library@dctc.edu!

    October 30, 2020 • Topical • Views: 533