Working Mothers in Higher Education

Celebrating Women’s History Month and International Women’s Day

The workforces at Dakota County Technical College and Inver Hills Community College feature six women who recently had new babies. In recognition of Women’s History Month, March 2020, and International Women’s Day, March 8, 2020, DCTC News is spotlighting these moms and the new members of their families.

6 facts about U.S. moms¹

By A.W. Geiger, Gretchen Livingston and Kristen Bialik

According to a recent article by the Pew Research Center, “American motherhood has changed in many ways since Mother’s Day was first celebrated more than 100 years ago. Today’s moms are more educated than ever before. A majority of women with a young child are in the labor force, and more mothers are serving as their family’s sole or primary ‘breadwinner.’

“At the same time, the share of mothers who are stay-at-home moms has held steady in recent decades after falling precipitously in the 1970s and 1980s.”

The article goes on to list six key findings:
  1. Women are more likely now to become mothers than they were a decade ago, and this is particularly the case among highly educated women.
  2. Women are becoming mothers later in life.
  3. Mothers are spending more time in the labor force than in the past, but also more time on childcare.
  4. About one-in-four mothers are raising their children on their own.
  5. Most Americans say women face a lot of pressure to be involved mothers.
  6. Foreign-born moms account for a rising share of U.S. births.

READ MORE…


Working mom spotlights

Jenna Baumgard

Admissions Advisor
Inver Hills Community College

Marvin and Jenna

Marvin and Jenna

Jenna Baumgard, 36, is originally from Green Bay, Wisconsin. Jenna graduated from Bay Port High School in Howard-Suamico, Wisconsin, in 2002. Jenna has a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Psychology from the University of Wisconsin–Eau Claire. She started working at Inver Hills in July 2010.

Jenna’s husband, Heath Baumgard, is the director of recruitment and admissions at Dakota County Technical College. Jenna and Heath have two children, a girl, Lauren, 10, and new baby boy, Marvin, 6 months. In her free time, Jenna enjoys cooking, walking/jogging, Vikings football and crafting with her daughter, Lauren. Jenna and her family reside in Eagan, Minnesota.

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

Lauren and Marvin

How happy he is. He’s just such a happy, smiley baby. He loves interacting with people and is so curious. Also, what is so interesting and amazing to me, is how much he looks like his older sister!

Genes have always been interesting to me (I’m adopted and look nothing like any of my family members, so with my children, I’ve been extra curious); and prior to him being born, I often found myself thinking about what he’d look like.

And while they do have their physical differences, and I’m sure more will surface as he ages, but for now we still cannot get over how much him and his older sister look alike!

Jenna Baumgard Q & A

What do you like best about working in higher education?
I love working with and for people. Having a career working in higher education has allowed me to do both. I love the diverse, talented and passionate people I get to work alongside of as well as the diverse experiences, needs and backgrounds of the students we serve. Every day is different, and just when you think you have everything figured out, something new and different presents itself.

I have also really enjoyed being able to promote academic-based and lifelong learning. My job is to promote personal advancement through formal college/higher education to those wanting to start, complete or come back to school—be it at Inver Hills or somewhere else. On a personal level, while I do not have multiple advance degrees or credentials, but this field allows for many opportunities for learning, growth, collaboration, and personal and professional development.

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
My biggest joy as a working mom is knowing that I’m providing for my family, but also creating an opportunity for myself to continue to be and develop the person I was before I was a mom. The skills, opportunities and experiences I have as a professional have positive and direct effects on how I parent.

I am constantly challenged to think differently or in a new way. I meet new people. I hear stories, good and not so good. All of these things help shape and or validate my perspectives, values and goals in life, but also in regards to being a mom. I do not think working full-time as a parent is the best (people do what is best for them and their families), but I do believe that being a professional enables me to be a different kind of parent; and the way I see it, for the better.

What is the greatest challenge of life as a working mom?
The greatest challenge that I have being a working mom, is the guilt surrounding time and schedules. Especially when my children are pre “school-aged”. While I believe, working is positive and necessary for me. I also feel guilty about not being with them more. Weekday schedules are so hectic and time flies by. Some days, most days, I feel there just aren’t enough hours in the day.

When you decide to have kids, you don’t get two extra hours each day, you learn to shuffle, manage, and multitask all of your resources (time, money, energy, attention) in ways that you never thought you could do. But with routines, a supportive environment, and balance, I simply do the best I can, which is what all good moms/parents do.

Three words that describe you as a mom:
EMPATHETIC. HUMBLE. NURTURING.

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
My mom without a doubt. Growing up, I never really truly understood everything she did, and to the level of grace and efficiency she did it. Of course, I thought she was a great mom then, but now (being a mom myself), I have a newfound appreciation.

I have two younger brothers, and all three of us are within four years of each other. How she managed all of us is beyond me. She worked as a speech therapist in our school district, got us to where we needed to go (all three of us were super involved with activities and sports), shopped for and made homemade meals six of the seven nights a week (or more), kept up with her own friends, interests and hobbies, kept the house in order, AND made sure we each felt loved, supported and happy.

I remember her always being calm, collected organized. We were disciplined, and my parents had expectations and rules like every household, but we rarely got yelled at. Everything my mom did (and still does) is done with what I view as perfection. Of course, no one is perfect, but there are many, many days I wish I could do the parenting thing (and just life in general) half as good as my mom did.

How I was raised definitely influences me and helps me strive to be the type of parent and person I want to be. I haven’t had the perfect life, far from it in fact. But my mom has always loved, provided for, supported, forgiven and encouraged me. I would not be who I am or where I am today without my mom. She is amazing!

How has becoming a new mother (again or for the first time) changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
I have a big age gap between my two kids—(almost) 10 years. A decade is a long time, and one that has helped me evolve both as a mom and as a professional. One of the big differences between being a first-time mom at 26, and now this time at 36, is that I’m  better at (1) having balance, (2) prioritizing and (3) asking for help/communicating.

I love my job and I love the people I work with. AND, I love my kids and my family! I can’t wave my magic wand (just to be clear, I don’t actually have one) and create 10 more hours in a week to make sure that literally “all the things” get done to my perfectionist side’s liking. But all three of these things help me know and accept that it is possible to be “both” and not just “either or.” I am both a mom and a professional.

And by having balance, prioritizing, and communicating/asking for help in both areas enables me to not feel like I’m trying to just be either a mom or a professional and live a life where neither part of me touches or affects the other.

What advice would you give young girls (or a younger version of yourself) about excelling as a woman, mom and working professional?
In the midst of it all, don’t forget to be kind and patient with yourself.

Lauren, Marvin, Jenna, Heath

Lauren, Marvin, Jenna, Heath

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

“There is no way to be a perfect mother, but a million ways to be a great one.”

— Jill Churchill


Aria Kronebusch

Project Coordinator: Title III Grant
Dakota County Technical College

Aria, Jorah and Jarrod

Aria, Jorah and Jarrod

Originally from Northeast Minneapolis, Aria Kronebusch, 29, graduated from Patrick Henry High School, Class of 2008. Aria earned a Bachelor of Individualized Studies (B.I.S.) with concentrations in Art, Urban Studies and Social Justice from the University of Minnesota Twin Cities. She started working at DCTC in 2017.

Aria’s husband, Jarrod, is the lead pricing analyst at Patterson Dental. Aria and Jarrod have a new baby boy, Jorah, who is 4 months old. Aria and Jarrod also have two pets, a 7-year-old, black-and-white cat named Link, and a 4-year-old Australian cattle dog/Australian shepherd mix named Zora. In her free time, Aria plays roller derby.

“I play with Minnesota Roller Derby in St. Paul,” Aria said. “My home team is the Atomic Bombshells, and I have also played with the All-Stars traveling team, although not this summer.”

Aria’s skater name is Wheelie Nelson, #511. Her first game back after having her baby was March 7, and she’ll now have a break until October. The All-Stars have a game April 25, 2020, at Roy Wilkins Auditorium in downtown St. Paul. Learn more by visiting Minnesota Roller Derby.

Aria also enjoys crafting, reading and trying new breweries. She and her family reside in South Minneapolis.

Atomic Bombshells (Aria: far left middle row) Photo by Ron Wilber

Atomic Bombshells (Aria: far left middle row) Photo by Ron Wilber

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

He is at such a fun age right now. He is giggling and “talking” and reacting to us, which is so cute.

Aria Kronebusch Q & A

What do you like best about working in higher education?
I love learning, and I want work that involves helping others. I think higher education is a unique space that combines those things together. We have the opportunity to make everything we do about equity and the betterment of our community as a whole, all while sharing the love of learning!

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
Snuggles when I get home.

What is the greatest challenge of life as a working mom?
Not being able to spend all day with my baby.

Three words that describe you as a mom:
EXCITED. LOVING. TIRED.

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
My grandma, Carolyn, has always been a big inspiration for me. She was a single mother who learned how to provide a life for herself and my mom. She showed me what a strong woman looks like. She has always been my biggest cheerleader, and now is so excited to be a part of Jorah’s life.

How has becoming a new mother (again or for the first time) changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
I have learned to embrace my pumping sessions throughout the workday as a small moment of time for myself—15 minutes I can spend reading what I want while making food for my baby, which is pretty special.

What advice would you give young girls (or a younger version of yourself) about excelling as a woman, mom and working professional?
You can do it all, but you don’t have to! Choose what brings you joy. No matter what you do, you are a #BossBabe.

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

“Sometimes the smallest things take up the most room in your heart”
— Winnie the Pooh


More about Women’s History Month 2020…²

Women’s History Month had its origins as a national celebration in 1981 when Congress passed Pub. L. 97-28 which authorized and requested the President to proclaim the week beginning March 7, 1982 as “Women’s History Week.” Throughout the next five years, Congress continued to pass joint resolutions designating a week in March as “Women’s History Week.” In 1987 after being petitioned by the National Women’s History Project, Congress passed Pub. L. 100-9 which designated the month of March 1987 as “Women’s History Month.”

Between 1988 and 1994, Congress passed additional resolutions requesting and authorizing the President to proclaim March of each year as Women’s History Month. Since 1995, presidents have issued a series of annual proclamations designating the month of March as “Women’s History Month.” These proclamations celebrate the contributions women have made to the United States and recognize the specific achievements women have made over the course of American history in a variety of fields.

LEARN MORE…

Shoua Madland

Academic Advisor
Inver Hills Community College

Ryan, Rory, Riley and Shoua

Ryan, Rory, Riley and Shoua

Shoua Madland, 32, was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, and grew up in North Carolina. Shoua graduated from Arlington Senior High School in 2005. She went on to earn a Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Business Administration from Metropolitan State University and then a Master of Public and Nonprofit Administration (M.P.N.A.), also from Metro State. She started her job at Inver Hills in 2016.

Shoua’s husband Ryan is a buyer at a company based in Oakdale, Minnesota. Shoua and Ryan have one daughter, Riley, 2.5, and a new baby boy, Rory, who’s only three weeks old. The family has one rescue dog named Zoey, who is about 4 years old and looks like she might be a pit bull mix. When she’s not working and raising her children, Shoua enjoys making lists, hanging out with family and friends, and cooking and eating. She resides with Ryan, Riley, Rory and Zoey in St. Paul.

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

The most amazing thing is just watching Rory grow and just how sweet and innocent he is.

Shoua Madland Q & A

Rory and Shoua

Rory and Shoua

What do you like best about working in higher education?
The best thing about my role in higher ed is being able to work with such diverse students and helping them on their journey.

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
The greatest joy about being a working mom is being able to inspire students, build a strong foundation for my family and know that the work I do matters.

What is the greatest challenge of life as a working mom?
The greatest challenge is never having enough time. I’m constantly thinking about what more I could be doing if I just had more time.

Three words that describe you as a mom:
CARING. PROTECTIVE. DETERMINED.

Shoua and Riley

Shoua and Riley

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
My mom inspires me most. She raised six of us kids and is one of the most hardworking, kind and resilient people that I know.

How has becoming a new mother (again or for the first time) changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
Becoming a mom has just opened up my eyes to all of the sacrifices and struggles parents go through. I celebrate everyday I’m on time for work now and all of the little things I used to take for granted. I also have a much deeper appreciation also for single parent households.

What advice would you give young girls (or a younger version of yourself) about excelling as a woman, mom and working professional?
My advice would be to never lose sight of why you do the work that you do. Find something you’re passionate about and the sacrifices and struggles will be so much easier if you are intentional and have a goal in mind.

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

It takes a village to raise a child. My children are being impacted, cared for, loved by and inspired by everyone and anyone they will interact with.


Kristen Pahl

Front Desk Coordinator in Enrollment Services
Dakota County Technical College

Kristen and Simon

Kristen and Simon

Kristen Pahl, 35, is originally from Apple Valley, Minnesota. Kristen graduated from Eastview High School, Class of 2003. She has a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Management and Economics from the University of Minnesota, Morris. She started working at DCTC in 2016.

Kristen’s husband, Mike, owns his own business, Nice Guy Technology. Kristen and Mike have a new baby boy, Simon, who was born February 4, 2020. Simon is a little over five weeks old and surrounded by houseplants. In her free time, Kristen loves playing board games. She also plays acoustic guitar and enjoys watching movies on the Hallmark Channel. Kristen and her family reside in Farmington, Minnesota.

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

The most amazing thing about Simon are the snuggles he gives!

Kristen Pahl  Q & A

What do you like best about working in higher education?
I love helping people, helping students by answering their questions, and hopefully helping them achieve their dreams! Getting to know the students and other staff members has been a wonderful part of my day!

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
I am currently on maternity leave, so I am not sure what my greatest joy will be once I am back at work. Right now I appreciate the joy of being able to spend my days with my son, getting to know him, but I know that I will get to return to the workplace to a job that I love!

Three words that describe you as a mom:
TIRED. GO-WITH-THE-FLOW. TIRED. 🙂

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
I am inspired by all of my coworkers who are mothers and the love they have for their children. I’m also inspired by the students we work with every day as well as my mom and grandmothers—I am grateful for the wisdom and advice they are able to give.

How has becoming a new mother changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
I think from the first moment that I saw Simon I knew that my priorities had changed and that gave me a new perspective on the world around me.

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

“Being a mother is learning about strengths you didn’t know you had and dealing with fears you never knew existed.”
— Linda Wooten


Tales from The Warehouse Trenches

“My Heroines”

 by Lisé Freking

Director of Strategic Marketing & Communications
Inver Hills Community College and Dakota County Technical College
Lisé Freking

Lisé Freking

Throughout my life, I have been surrounded by strong women: my mother, my sisters, my grandmothers and my aunts. Physically strong. Mentally strong. Spiritually strong. They are all my heroines. These women in my life influenced me in so many ways growing up and still have an impact on me today. This month’s blog is dedicated to all of the strong women in each of our lives.

My mother taught me that hard work would never hurt me—including how to make a bed so a quarter would bounce off of it and how to clean a bathroom like a professional! She was a nurse in open heart surgery at a time when there weren’t many options open for women; she was truly a pioneer in her day. She worked full-time while raising four young daughters by herself for a few years.

My mother taught me to get back up when I was knocked down. She taught me how to balance being a working mom and a professional (and she taught me my keen, organized, list-making skills) and how to keep a stiff upper lip when the going gets tough (remember—crying just makes your eyes red). It makes me proud to be her daughter every day.

What didn’t my sisters teach me? They taught me to stick up for myself when the neighborhood boys picked a fight. They taught me how to run wild in the cabin woods. They taught me forgiveness (hmmm, on second thought, I am still mad about my sister, Laura, ruining my new shirt when she was in 9th grade). They taught me that they have my back no matter what. Separately we are each individually strong; together we are even stronger. Word of warning: don’t ever pick a fight with the Herold sisters! Losing isn’t an option for us.

I was blessed to have four grandmothers growing up. I was the luckiest girl in the world. My grandma Maxine worked on WWII aircraft like Rosie the Riveter—the symbol of feminine capability—the gal with the “we can do it” attitude.

Grandma Peg worked hard on a crop farm in Wisconsin. Her daily workout was gardening, canning and farming. She was up working before the sun rose and still working after it set.

Grandma Clara was a no-nonsense leader in the community and at home. She was just as tough on the golf course too!

Grandma Dorothy played the best euchre game in the state of Wisconsin—we never wanted to disappoint her! They all balanced managing households and holding down jobs without the modern conveniences of dishwashers, microwaves, and cell phones!

I would spend weeks during the summer at my Aunt Linda’s and at my Aunt Marsha’s.  My Aunt Linda showed me how to swim and how to change a diaper. Aunt Marsha showed me how to love unconditionally. Aunt Susie instilled a love of tennis (and competitiveness) in me. To this day, my aunts support my sisters and me, as well as our children in everything we do—despite long distances between us (Facebook can be beneficial after all).

One of my favorite heroines is Helen Parr, aka, Elastigirl, aka, Mrs. Incredible. Who can forget the scene in The Incredibles when she is piloting a jet that is under enemy fire? (She was on her way  to save Mr. Incredible, of course!) She realizes that her two of her children are stowaways onboard the aircraft just as the aircraft is getting shot down. She manages to safely shield Violet and Dash while staying in contact with the incompetent babysitter taking care of  Baby Jack Jack. And, she goes on to rescue her husband. What a woman!

To the next generation of Super Heroines: You will rule the world! My daughters and my nieces inspire me every day with their academic,  athletic and professional achievements. They will move any mountain and overcome any obstacles in their way. Each one of them is extremely talented in all that they do. I love it when we can all be together—our dinner discussions are full of opinionated debates and a lot of laughter.

Over the last few years, I have been fortunate to be surrounded by the many influential women at The Warehouse. So, to my heroines at The Warehouse, each of you inspires me every time I work out. You make me physically, mentally and spiritually stronger. The camaraderie of The Warehouse heroines makes me feel like I belong. I  belong to a community of like-minded, strong women who support and push each other.

I can’t wait for Facebook posts every day to learn who has become a coach, who has inspired another member to push their limits, or who has been nominated to the Hall of Fame. I look forward to seeing each of you every time I am at The Warehouse. We are all juggling work, family and life while making time to exercise and stay strong.

Thank you for being in my life!

Note: Lisé is also a working mom in higher ed; she has three children, Grayson, 25, Gabriella, 19, and Gianna, 17.
Lisé with her sisters and mom: (left to right) Laura Lee Jones, Rebecca Herold, Mary Herold, Anna Herold, Lisé Freking

Lisé with her sisters and mom: (left to right) Laura Lee Jones, Rebecca Herold, Mary Herold, Anna Herold, Lisé Freking

Libby Fahrenkamp

Admissions Advisor
Inver Hills Community College

Travis, Dietrich and Libby

Travis, Dietrich and Libby

Originally from Crystal, Minnesota, Libby Fahrenkamp, 29, graduated from Cooper High School in 2008. Libby has a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Communication and Political Science from the University of Minnesota Duluth, graduating magna cum laude. She started her role at Inver Hills in 2015.

Libby’s husband, Travis, is a child and adolescent psychiatrist. Libby and Travis have a new baby boy, Dietrich, who is 2 months old. The family has two pets, a 10-year-old domestic medium-hair cat named Medusa and a 10-month-old husky/cattle dog puppy named Waffles.

When she’s not working and raising her son, Libby enjoys gardening when the weather’s nice. She also likes trying new restaurants, hiking and camping up north, and spending time with family and friends. Libby, Travis, Dietrich, Medusa and Waffles live in Minneapolis.

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

His smile.

Libby Fahrenkamp Q & A

Dietrich and Libby

Dietrich and Libby

What do you like best about working in higher education?
I love working with such a diverse population, and being able to help each student make a plan to achieve their specific goals.

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
Well, at this point I haven’t gone back to work yet, but I am excited to hopefully find joy in both as I transition back to work in April. I love my job, and cannot imagine my life without it, but right now I am enjoying spending the first months at home with my baby.

What is the greatest challenge of life as a working mom?
Dealing with the opinions of others has been the hardest so far. There are a lot of expectations placed on women, and those seem to multiply when you add children.

Three words that describe you as a mom:
EMPATHETIC. ANXIOUS. LOVING.

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
My own mom and mother-in-law have made a huge impact on my life, especially as I think about the type of mother I want to be. I am also inspired by many of the moms I have the privilege of working with. Jenna, Emily J, Wendy, Shoua, Kari and Amanda B are just a few that have greatly impacted my transition into motherhood and my passion for my work.

How has becoming a new mother (again or for the first time) changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
Even while pregnant, I began to see a change in how I interacted with others, and found I was able to meet people where they were at in a totally different way, especially the parents that I work with. Even though I worry about some things more than I did before, I also see beauty in things I didn’t because I imagine what it will be like to experience them through the eyes of Dietrich as he grows.

What advice would you give young girls (or a younger version of yourself) about excelling as a woman, mom and working professional?
Do what makes you happy and what fits your passion and skills. The decisions you make might not make everyone else happy, but in the end you know you best. There is no such things as a perfect “balance” in life, but that doesn’t mean you can’t live a life full of sometimes competing priorities.

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

Every day there are new challenges, but there are also always new things to celebrate, and every parent has the skills to parent their child best, even when it feels totally impossible.


Michelle Boe

Adjunct Faculty, Paralegal Program
Inver Hills Community College

Former Executive Director
Inver Hills Foundation & DCTC Foundation

Senior Development Officer
University of Minnesota Foundation

Jack and Michelle

Jack and Michelle

Originally from Woodbury, Minnesota, Michelle Boe, 32, is a graduate of Woodbury High School, Class of 2006. Michelle attended the William Mitchell College of Law (now Mitchell Hamline School of Law) in St. Paul, earning her Juris Doctor (J.D.) in May 2013. She has a Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Communication Studies from the University of Minnesota with a minor in Cultural Studies & Comparative Literature as well as Studies in Cinema & Media Culture.

Michelle served as the executive director for both college foundations from January 2018 to October 2019, having been the DCTC Foundation director since January 2016. She is an adjunct instructor in the Paralegal program at Inver Hills.

Michelle worked as an associate attorney at Arthur, Chapman, Kettering, Smetak, & Pikala, P.A., a law firm in Minneapolis. She came to the firm from the Fourth Judicial District Court in Hennepin County, having served as a law clerk for the Honorable Referee Mary Madden.

Michelle’s husband, Kelly, served as head basketball coach for the DCTC Blue Knights for three years. Kelly’s teams won NJCAA District VII and Region XIII championships and advanced to the NJCAA Division II National Tournament during all three seasons he led the program.

Michelle and Kelly have a new baby boy named Jack, who was born July 16, 2019. Between them, Michelle and Kelly also have 14 nieces and nephews.

What’s the most amazing thing about your new baby?

He is a happy, loving, smart, beautiful child—and a fantastic sleeper (sorry other moms!).

Michelle Boe Q & A

What do you like best about working in higher education?
The energy and excitement of opportunity in colleges and universities: for learning/career advancement, for research and discovery, for athletic success and for community building.

Jack

Jack

What is the greatest joy of life as a working mom?
The best part of every day is coming home and seeing the smile on Jack’s face when I walk through the door. He is growing and developing so quickly, and it is amazing all the new things he is learning and doing. Seeing that growth is one of the best parts. The baby laughs and kisses aren’t bad either.

What is the greatest challenge of life as a working mom?
Letting go of the guilt of loving my job and loving being at work even though it means being away from him during the week and sometimes at night. And generally balancing being a mom, being a wife, having a career that I love, and doing all the little things like laundry, grocery shopping, etc. Same challenges of so many working moms (and dads).

Three words that describe you as a mom:
AFFECTIONATE. GOOFY. ATTENTIVE.

What woman in your life or in the news inspires you the most?
All the other moms I work with at the U and the moms in this article. These are some of the most impressive professionals in Minnesota, and the love and support they provide each other, with no judgment, is inspirational.

How has becoming a new mother (again or for the first time) changed your perspective on the workplace and the world?
I never imagined how incredibly difficult it would be to be a working mother. There is not enough time in the day to get everything done, it can be hard on your marriage, and it’s tough to find time for yourself.

What advice would you give young girls (or a younger version of yourself) about excelling as a woman, mom and working professional?
Choose your spouse wisely! It is so important to pick someone you love and feel would be true partner in parenting. My husband is a wonderful and involved dad who makes it possible for me to work as much as I do. Having a child is super hard on a marriage/relationship, so it is important to choose someone who will support you as a wife, mother, and professional.

Favorite quote or insight about motherhood in the modern world:

“For me, being a mother made me a better professional, because coming home every night to my girls reminded me what I was working for. And being a professional made me a better mother, because by pursuing my dreams, I was modeling for my girls how to pursue their dreams.”
— Michelle Obama


More about International Women’s Day…³

International Women’s Day (March 8) is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The day also marks a call to action for accelerating women’s equality.

International Women’s Day (IWD) has occurred for well over a century, with the first IWD gathering in 1911 supported by more than a million people. Today, IWD belongs to all groups collectively everywhere. IWD is not country, group or organization specific.

#IWD2020
#EachforEqual

LEARN MORE…

Learn more about applying to DCTC by contacting:

Admissions
651-423-8000
Enrollment Services
Room 2–110

¹ Courtesy of the Pew Research Center
² Courtesy of Women’s History Month 2020
³ Courtesy of International Women’s Day

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