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Give Blood: Help Others

American Red Cross Blood Drive

Make a difference and donate blood through the America Red Cross on Thursday, Oct. 3. The number one reason donors say they give blood is because they “want to help others” and just one donation can help save the lives of up to three people. The American Red Cross supplies about 40 percent of the nation’s blood supply and most of that comes from mobile blood drives, like the one at Dakota County Technical College. You’ll also receive a mini-physical that checks your blood pressure, pulse, body temperature and hemoglobin.

  • When: Thursday, Oct. 3, 2013 | 7 a.m. to 2 p.m
  • Where: Dakota Room (1-502) | Dakota County Technical College, Rosemount Campus
Facts about blood needs
Courtesy of the American Red Cross
  • Every two seconds someone in the U.S. needs blood.
  • More than 44,000 blood donations are needed every day.
  • A total of 30 million blood components are transfused each year in the U.S. (2006).
  • The average red blood cell transfusion is approximately three pints.
  • The blood type most often requested by hospitals is Type O.
  • The blood used in an emergency is already on the shelves before the event occurs.
  • Sickle cell disease affects more than 80,000 people in the U.S., 98 percent of whom are African American. Sickle cell patients can require frequent blood transfusions throughout their lives.
  • More than 1 million new people are diagnosed with cancer each year. Many of them will need blood, sometimes daily, during their chemotherapy treatment.
  • A single car accident victim can require as many as 100 pints of blood.

Visit the Student Life Center on the DCTC Rosemount campus for more information and to sign-up. WALK-INs Welcome!

The Donation Process Step by Step

Donating blood is a simple thing to do, but it can make a big difference in the lives of others. The donation process from the time you arrive until the time you leave takes about an hour. The donation itself is only 8–10 minutes on average. The steps in the process are:

Courtesy of the American Red Cross

For more information about the Blood Drive or Student Life at DCTC, contact:

Sustainable Food Systems in the Pioneer Press

At Dakota County Tech, produce and students’ expertise both grow

Ann Marie Hamel, left, and Wynne Sutton, students at Dakota County Technical College in Rosemount, build a Hugel Kultur bed for growing plants and vegetables, as part of their class in Sustainable Food Systems, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

 

By Christopher Magan, Pioneer Press reporter

Dry leaves are packed in between horizontal logs, as students at Dakota County Technical College in Rosemount build a Hugel Kultur bed for growing plants and vegetables, as part of their class in Sustainable Food Systems, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

A group of students at Dakota County Technical College are learning how sustainable food production is increasingly becoming part of the landscape.

Matt Brooks, an instructor of landscape horticulture, launched a certificate program last month in sustainable food systems to train students in how to create environmentally friendly gardens. The certificate complements the college’s landscape horticulture associate’s degree.

Matt Brooks, a horticulture instructor at Dakota County Technical College in Rosemount helps to build a Hugel Kultur bed for growing plants and vegetables, as part of his class in Sustainable Food Systems, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

Brooks spent a year developing the courses after a growing number of his students showed more interest in parts of existing classes that addressed sustainable food production.

“It was a small piece, but students really dug into it,” Brooks said.

For most of Brooks’ career, landscape design was aboutmaking things “ornamental and pretty, not productive,” he said. But that is changing as more consumers opt to eat locally produced fruits and vegetables.

Now, clients are increasingly asking for landscapes that are not only resource efficient, but that produce food.

Consumers are learning that food sold in grocery stores often is produced with dangerous pesticides and can be less nutritious, Brooks said. “People are starting to see the value in locally produced food and growing their own food.”

The certificate program focuses on growing, harvesting and marketing sustainably grown produce on small urban and suburban plots. Students have begun creating a living lab on the college campus where they can experiment with different gardening methods.

Wynne Sutton soaks a Hugel Kultur bed with water, as students at Dakota County Technical College in Rosemount build the large horseshoe shaped bed for growing plants and vegetables, as part of their class in Sustainable Food Systems, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

On a hot day recently, students piled up tree branches and other brush they would later cover with soil to create a planting bed. This hugel kultur bed, Brooks explained, allows organic material to break down and is a highly efficient way of holding moisture and nutrients for plants.

Students Wynne Sutton of Eagan and John Beall of South St. Paul took a break from lugging logs to talk about how Brooks’ courses piqued their appetite. Both are retirees embarking on second careers.

Sutton plans to start her own business creating raised gardening beds for the elderly and disabled.

She earned her associate’s degree in the spring, but returned because the new certificate program fit so nicely with her business model.

Beall, a former family practice doctor, enrolled in the program to feed his passion for gardening.

“I’m finally doing something I love,” he said with a smile. “I always thought I knew a lot about gardening, but I’m learning now I was wrong.”

Sutton and Beall see consumers’ growing interest in locally produced food as a return to simpler times.

“We are coming full circle,” Sutton said. “Some of the things we are learning about are similar to what our grandparents did on the family farm.”

Christopher Magan can be reached at 651-228-5557. Follow him at twitter.com/cmaganPiPress

For more information about the new Sustainable Food Systems certificate and Landscape Horticulture at DCTC, contact:

Jesse Grothe, a student at Dakota County Technical College in Rosemount helps build a Hugel Kultur bed for growing plants and vegetables, by shoveling compost on top of a horseshoe-shaped pile of logs, branches and leaves, as part of a class in Sustainable Food Systems, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

Student Mike Vath, left, and instructor Matt Brooks help with the construction of a Hugel Kultur bed for growing plants and vegetables, as part of their class in Sustainable Food Systems at Dakota County Technical College, a 27-credit certificate that is part of the Landscape Horticulture program, photographed on Wednesday, September 4, 2013. (Pioneer Press: Scott Takushi)

 

Men’s Soccer Reaches Highest Ranking in Team History

DCTC athletes ranked ninth in NJCAA and NSCAA Division I Poll

DCTC Blue Knights vs. Oakton Community College | Oct. 7, 2012

The Blue Knight’s men’s soccer team is ranked ninth this week on the National Junior College Athletic Association’s Division I Top 25 poll and the National Soccer Coaches Division I Top 20 poll. Last year was the first time the team achieved a top 20 ranking in the poll and now this is the highest ranking the team has reached in DCTC’s Division I men’s soccer athletic history.

Cam Stoltz

Cam Stoltz | Head Soccer Coach

Head Soccer Coach Cam Stoltz explains that this year’s team is a blend of returning and new students. “They respect what DCTC has done and want to better the program and themselves,” he said. The team was 10th after winning against the Riverland Community College Blue Devils on Sept. 4 and defeating the Bismarck State College Mystics on Sept. 15 by a score of 3–0.

“We are undefeated and being ranked in the top ten is like riding a wave. The challenge becomes increasingly difficult, but the experience and lessons are invaluable,” said Stoltz.

Men’s soccer, with an overall record of 7–0–0, has scored 23 goals to only three against them. The team has a challenging schedule this week with three away matches. On Wednesday, Sept. 18, they head to Coon Rapids, Minn., to face the Anoka-Ramsey Community College Golden Rams, who are currently ranked ninth nationally in NJCAA Division III. Then they head to DuPage, Ill., for a tournament on Sept. 21–22.

Stoltz has confidence in his team to compete in a national level schedule. “The students have always worked hard and continue to be proud of the college,” he said. “Our goal is to use the soccer experience to provide lessons that transcend into the classroom and beyond DCTC.”

For more information about Blue Knights soccer, contact:

Veterans Vote for DCTC

DCTC Awarded 2014 Military Friendly Schools ® Designation

Victory Media, the premier media entity for military personnel transitioning into civilian life, has named Dakota County Technical College to the coveted Military Friendly Schools® list. The 2014 Military Friendly Schools® list honors the top 20 percent of colleges, universities and trade schools in the country that are doing the most to embrace America’s military service members, veterans, and spouses as students and ensure their success on campus.

“Inclusion on the 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools® shows DCTC’s commitment to providing a supportive environment for military students,” said Sean Collins, Vice President at Victory Media and a nine-year Navy veteran.   “The need for education is growing and our mission is to provide the military community with transparent, world-class resources to assist in their search for schools.”  Complete survey methodology is available at militaryfriendlyschools.com/Article/methodology-press-kit.

The Military Friendly Schools® media and website, found at www.militaryfriendlyschools.com, feature the list, interactive tools and search functionality to help military students find the best school to suit their unique needs and preferences.  The 1,868 colleges, universities and trade schools on this year’s list exhibit leading practices in the recruitment and retention of students with military experience.  These schools have world-class programs and policies for student support on campus, academic accreditation, credit policies, flexibility and other services to those who served.

Now in its fifth year, the 2014 list of Military Friendly Schools ® was compiled through extensive research and a data-driven survey of more than 10,000 schools nationwide approved for VA tuition funding. The survey results that comprise the 2014 list were independently tested by Ernst & Young LLP based upon the weightings and methodology established by Victory Media. Each year schools taking the survey are held to a higher standard than the previous year via improved methodology, criteria and weightings developed with the assistance of an Academic Advisory Board (AAB) consisting of educators from schools across the country.  A full list of board members can be found at http://militaryfriendlyschools.com/board.

A full story and detailed list of 2014 Military Friendly Schools® will be highlighted in the annual Guide to Military Friendly Schools ®, distributed in print and digital format to hundreds of thousands of active and former military personnel in early October.

ABOUT Victory Media Inc
Victory Media is a service-disabled, veteran-owned small business that has been serving the military community since 2001. Our data-driven Military Friendly® lists are published in G.I. Jobs, Military Spouse, Vetrepreneur media channels, republished in periodicals like USA Today, Wall Street Journal, Fortune, Bloomberg BW and are frequently cited on national TV by NBC, ABC, CBS, CNN, CNBC, Fox News and others.

For more information about the Veterans Resource Center at DCTC, as well as, other veterans services offered at the college, contact:
  • Katherine Bachman
    Coordinator
    South Metro Region Higher Education Veterans Program
    651-423-8627

Xcel Energy Grant Helps DCTC Students Succeed

Front row: Steve Addy, Electrical Lineworker Instructor; Jake Sedlacek, Manager of Community Relations & Economic Development; Tharan Leopold, Executive Director of Foundation; Thomas Erickson, Electrical Lineworker Instructor; Mike Opp, Dean of Transportation & Industry

DCTC Foundation received grant to fund Electrical Lineworker scholarships

On Sept. 6, 2013, the Dakota County Technical College Foundation received a $10,000 grant from Xcel Energy to fund scholarships in the college’s Electrical Lineworker program. Xcel Energy invests in local communities with grants, charitable contributions and volunteer time.

“Xcel Energy is pleased to support DCTC’s Electrical Lineworker program,” said Jake Sedlacek, manager of community relations and  economic development. “It’s a quality program that produces quality lineworkers. They not only know what they’re doing, but they do it very well.”

Through Xcel Energy’s focus area grants, the company supports nonprofit 501(c)(3) organizations that improve science, technology, engineering, economics and math education; improve and enhance the natural environment; help individuals achieve economic self-sufficiency; and that provides access to arts and culture.

“Xcel Energy is committed to improving the health of our communities,” said Sedlacek. “This grant will support the education of DCTC’s Electrical Lineworker students and better educated students will ensure safer delivery of our power.”

About Xcel Energy
Xcel Energy is a major U.S. electricity and natural gas company operating in eight Western and Midwestern states. The company is committed to providing cost-effective, clean, responsible energy delivered with the highest standards for safety, reliability and responsiveness. Xcel Energy supports communities in four important focus areas: math and science education, environmental stewardship, job training, placement, and creation, and access to arts and culture. In 2012, Xcel Energy invested $8 million in support of communities across its service territory.

About the DCTC Foundation
Established in 1983 as a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization, the DCTC Foundation is governed by a board of directors with up to 18 members. Since its inception, the Foundation has generated more than $3.2 million in financial assistance for students while building a general endowment fund and establishing private endowment funds.

For more information about the DCTC Electrical Lineworker program, contact:
For more information about the DCTC Foundation, contact:
  • Tharan Leopold
    Executive Director of Foundation & Alumni
    651-423-8293